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Mercedes-Benz EQS – what electric luxury looks like

Mercedes-Benz EQS - what electric luxury looks like
Mercedes-Benz EQS - what electric luxury looks like

It will certainly be popular with a certain segment of luxury car buyers, but EQS will not revolutionize the electric car market. And only because it has already happened. Mercedes-Benz EQS – what electric luxury looks like.

It’s been almost a decade since the first introduction of the Tesla S, which embraced all first-time users with its sleek blend of technological efficiency and exciting driving style.  Elon Musk’s company plans to release an updated version of the Model S this year, possibly around the same time that EQS hits dealerships. It is still unclear what Mercedes-Benz EQS offers more than the Model S, except for a more cluttered interior and a higher price for the brand.

EQS is going to plunge into the luxury segment of electric cars, which is already crowded with such as Audi E-Tron, Jaguar I-Pace, Polestar 2 and Porsche Taycan. Other vehicles will soon be available, including the Cadillac Lyriq, BMW i4, Lexus LF-Z and Lucid Air. Do we really need more luxury electric cars?

Obviously, no luxury electric segment would be complete without a battery-powered S-Class. Mercedes is widely seen as lagging behind other major automakers in the production of new electric vehicles. The company’s $ 68,000 EQC SUV was scheduled to launch in the United States in early 2020, but that was postponed until 2021, and the cart is still there.

If Mercedes is going to fulfill its promise to release 10 new electric cars by 2022, it really needs to press the accelerator pedal, time is short.

The main characteristics of the Mercedes-Benz EQS

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Mercedes is not interested in the minimalist design of electric cars. With EQS, Mercedes speaks to the idea of ​​rarely designed electric car interiors. It has the largest screen, the highest range (at the moment), most features, a really shocking number of physical touch points, the softest headrests. This is a fully electric S-Class in the literal sense.

The Mercedes-Benz EQS will be available in two battery sizes: 90 kWh and 107.8 kWh. For comparison, the most powerful Tesla, model S long-range, has a battery capacity of 100 kWh. The estimated battery life of 107.8 kWh is up to 770 km (478.5 miles) based on the generous WLTP standard. (The nominal EPA range will definitely be lower.)

The 400-volt architecture is liquid-cooled through special cavities cast in an aluminum battery case that automatically preheats or cools to speed up charging. This can be very useful when charging the battery before charging it, especially in winter temperatures.

When connected to a 200 kWh fast charger, the EQS battery will add approximately 300 kilometers (186 miles) in 15 minutes. This is faster than most Mercedes competitors.

He will be entitled to the Plug and Charge system, a technological concept originally introduced by ISO 15118, the international standard for charging electric vehicles. This means that the EQS will be compatible with approximately 90% of public charging stations without having to download the application or register with an individual charging service.

In electric cars, the best aerodynamics is equal to the improved range – therefore, the body has a very low drag. Mercedes claims a drag coefficient of 0.20 as the best in the world.

It will be available in rear and all-wheel drive configurations.

The single-engine configuration will receive 329 horsepower with rear-wheel drive, while the dual / all-wheel drive trim level will receive 516 horsepower.

The Mercedes-Benz EQS features a giant 55-inch pole-to-pole touchscreen, which Mercedes calls the Hyper screen, which is the hub of the second-generation MBUX infotainment system, which avoids physical buttons in favor of a fully digital (and voice-controlled) user experience. In fact, it is not one solid display, but three separate screens built into one solid piece of curved glass.