Education

Imaging technology for living cells illuminates the perspective of obese molecules

Imaging technology for living cells illuminates the perspective of obese molecules
Imaging technology for living cells illuminates the perspective of obese molecules

A research team from the University of Utah and the University of Central Florida has developed a tool to track cellular events that can cause obesity-related diseases in humans. Imaging technology for living cells illuminates the perspective of obese molecules.

The team led by Anhong Zhou, professor in the UCS Department of Biological Engineering, has developed an optical sensor image for nanoprobe that uses diffuse light to provide structural traces to molecules. Probes can be used to more easily identify and describe cell surface receptors that can drive or stop cellular responses to certain external stimuli. The investigation allows several surface receptors to be monitored in one cell and offers researchers an unprecedented view of cell surface activity. Zhou and his team, including doctors in biotechnology. Student Wei Zhang uses this new nanoprobe to successfully recognize cellular receptors that recognize fatty acids at the level of individual living cells.

Must Read: Micro-pollution ravaging China and South Asia: take a look at

The technique is an important step in developing a better understanding of certain cellular events and can have a wide impact on studies of fat intake and the development of obesity. This new method can also be used as a simple screening technique to test external stimuli that activate surface cell receptors and cause the binding of fatty acids. This will be an effective test to ensure that new drugs accurately stimulate proper cellular activity that leads to obesity and other conditions associated with obesity. The work of Zhou and his team became warmer because the prevalence of obesity affected public health in the United States.

According to Zhou, this research is an interesting collaboration between researchers and agrees with his belief that biotechnology is an important frontier in the scientific community. “This is an excellent example that meets our long-term goal of using technical tools to solve biological problems,” he said. “In recent years we have been very excited to develop new cell analysis technology that can benefit from human health problems such as obesity. We are currently expanding this technology to develop new methods for cancer screening.” Source

About the author

informal

Add Comment

Click here to post a comment

Molazmat

Open chat